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Episodes

The Nearly Man: Casualties – August 1975 (ITV 9 Dec 1975, with Jane Lowe)

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In Casualties, now that the dissension in the ranks between Christopher and Ron Hibbert and his little group is out in the open Hibbert needs to make a decision about what to do next. It’s clear that ideally he’d like to take Collinson’s place. Bernard King feels he needs to clear the air between Collinson and Hibbert but there is only going to be one winner out of all this. King knows that Hibbert is a brilliant agent and if only he could get over his feelings towards Christopher they could work brilliantly together. The meeting, and a stark conversation with his wife, clarifies Hibbert’s feelings and he decides to resign.

Meanwhile Alice and Brian are still edging towards something. Brian has made the decision to divorce his wife.

With just one episode to go we are moving into the endgame of whether Christopher will actually get into government or not. Almost every line of dialogue in this episode is a gem interestly though the emphasis is more on Hibbert than Collinson.

The TV Times of the week (6 Dec 75) had an indepth 3 page feature on the life of Wilfred Pickles who had been a well known personality for 50 years and was in the twilight of his career by this stage.

The Nearly Man Casualties

Michael Elphick is superb as Ron Hibbert.

classic quote
“Frank your conversation is remarkable for being even more abusive than your letters. But invective is not argument.”

production details
UK / ITV – Granada / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Tuesday 9 December 1975 at 9.00pm

Writer: Arthur Hopcraft / Production Design: Chris Wilkinson / Director: Alan Grint

Series: The Nearly Man Episode 6

cast
Tony Britton as Christopher Collinson
Ann Firbank as Alice Collinson
David Wilkinson as David Collinson
Wilfred Pickles as Bernard King
Michael Elphick as Ron Hibbert
Gwen Taylor as Dorothy Hibbert
John Leyton as Brian Griffin
Ian East a Maurice Wrigley
Steven Grives as Len
Kate Fahy as Millie Dutton
Tim Barlow as Frank
Jane Lowe as Phyllis
Jon Morrison as Alan
Anthony Roye as Mr Arnold
Josie Lane as May King
Phillip Moore as Michael Hibbert
Helen Cadwallader as Jane Hibbert

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Episodes

Hazell: Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost (ITV 31 May 1979, with Meg Davies)

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Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost

In Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost our intrepid hero pays a visit to the seaside when an accountant, Peter Harlow, calls him in over a cottage he has been left in a will. He has no idea why he has been left the cottage but since he has taken over ownership more than a few strange things have been happening.

Hazell stays at the cottage for a few days and manages to find no small amount of comfort when Harlow’s wife Stephanie turns up (Harlow himself is in New York). Although there is clearly something spooky going on it’s definitely man made and it doesn’t take Hazell too long to work it out.

The episode was a rare outing outside of London for the series, it was filmed in the East Anglian village of Walberswick and surrounds. Although all the interiors were filmed in studio of coure.

classic quote
I may be common but I’m not stupid

production details
UK / ITV – Thames / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Thursday 31 May 1979

Writer: Richard Harris / Production Design: Philip Blowers, Peter Elliot / Director: Mike Vardy

Series: Hazell Season 2 Episode 7

cast
Nicholas Ball as Hazell
Michael Gaunt as Peter Harlow
John Woodnutt as Vicar
Desmond Llewellyn as Bell
Richard Simpson as Weaver
Meg Davies as Stephanie Harlow
Desmond McNamara as Tel
Peter Woodward as Gregory Summers
Joy Steward as Mrs Summers

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Episodes

Blake’s 7: Breakdown (BBC-1 6 Mar 1978, with Julian Glover)

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Episodes

Blake’s 7: Project Avalon (BBC-1 27 Feb 1978, with Glynis Barber)

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