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Episodes

The Nearly Man: Options (ITV 16 Dec 1975, with Wilfred Pickles)

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In Options, the final episode of the series, Christopher still finds the war over his constituency is not quite over. His new agent Maurice Wrigley, having replaced Ron Hibbert, makes it plain that if he wants the community’s backing he needs to speak up for their issues at the upcoming Labour Party Conference. Collinson has always held the conferences in a certain amount of contempt.

The party group Chris is involved with also want Collinson to be something of an apologist for the government when he does give his speech – if he won’t they will drop all support for him.

Meanwhile despite seeming to have moved forward professionally Collinson’s personal life is as downbeat as ever. Mistress Millie is starting to feel as though she is ready to move on. His family life is still in disarray. Caught between a rock and a hard place Collinson has some very tough decisions to make.

A fabulous downbeat end to the series, having seemed to be building up to a prominent new position Chris ends up right back to where he started. Throughout the series the dialogue and performances have been perfectly measured and played. The final moments see a Collinson, back at home with his wife, confronting his failings and finding something of a coming to terms with himself.

The Nearly Man Options

classic quote
“My error, it seems, has been my sceptiscism. I’ve not actually believed in politics as a way of life.”

production details
UK / ITV – Granada / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Tuesday 16 December 1975 at 9.00pm

Writer: Arthur Hopcraft / Production Design: Chris Wilkinson / Director: John Irvin

Series: The Nearly Man Episode 7

cast
Tony Britton as Christopher Collinson
Ann Firbank as Alice Collinson
David Wilkinson as David Collinson
John Leyton as Brian Griffin
Wilfred Pickles as Bernard King
Ian McCulloch as Peter Richards
Katherine Fahy as Millie Dutton
Ian East as Maurice Wrigley
John Tebay as John

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Episodes

Hazell: Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost (ITV 31 May 1979, with Meg Davies)

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Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost

In Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost our intrepid hero pays a visit to the seaside when an accountant, Peter Harlow, calls him in over a cottage he has been left in a will. He has no idea why he has been left the cottage but since he has taken over ownership more than a few strange things have been happening.

Hazell stays at the cottage for a few days and manages to find no small amount of comfort when Harlow’s wife Stephanie turns up (Harlow himself is in New York). Although there is clearly something spooky going on it’s definitely man made and it doesn’t take Hazell too long to work it out.

The episode was a rare outing outside of London for the series, it was filmed in the East Anglian village of Walberswick and surrounds. Although all the interiors were filmed in studio of coure.

classic quote
I may be common but I’m not stupid

production details
UK / ITV – Thames / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Thursday 31 May 1979

Writer: Richard Harris / Production Design: Philip Blowers, Peter Elliot / Director: Mike Vardy

Series: Hazell Season 2 Episode 7

cast
Nicholas Ball as Hazell
Michael Gaunt as Peter Harlow
John Woodnutt as Vicar
Desmond Llewellyn as Bell
Richard Simpson as Weaver
Meg Davies as Stephanie Harlow
Desmond McNamara as Tel
Peter Woodward as Gregory Summers
Joy Steward as Mrs Summers

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Episodes

Blake’s 7: Breakdown (BBC-1 6 Mar 1978, with Julian Glover)

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Episodes

Blake’s 7: Project Avalon (BBC-1 27 Feb 1978, with Glynis Barber)

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