Connect with us
Six Days of Justice Six Days of Justice

Episodes

Six Days of Justice: Cross-Fire (ITV 10 Apr 1972, with George Sewell)

Published

on

The opening episode of Cross-Fire was a case of a couple, Mr and Mrs Brown, going through a divorce and fighting for custody of their two children.

Anthony Brown is a self made businessman and his wife contends that he has been having an affair for the last few years and has given her no alternative. Mr Brown is denying the allegations. As with so many divorce cases involving children it is their custody that is the most contentious issue.

Familiar faces here include George Sewell (who was starring in Special Branch but cropped up in guest appearances in almost every show going in the 1970’s), Gwen Cherrell and Malcolm Terris.

The case, as with all the cases featured on the series was fictitious but could easily have come from the files of any magistrate’s court. The producers made a real effort to make the court proceedings as authentic as possible. It’s very similar in style and content to the daytime series Crown Court which started later in 1972.

production details
UK / ITV – Thames / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Monday 10 April 1972 at 9.00pm

Writer: Maggie Allen / Production Design: Mike Hall / Director: Reginald Collin

Series: Six Days of Justice Season 1 Episode 1

cast
George Sewell as Anthony Brown
Gwen Cherrell as Lorna Brown
Malcolm Terris as Pender
Norman Henry as Rosson
Eric McCaine as Warrant officer
George Waring as Clerk of the Court
Sheela Wilcocks as Usher
Dorothy Reynolds as Chairman
Barbara Olgilvie as Mrs Coles
Pauline Letts as Mrs Prince
Anne Rutter as Probation officer
Michael Mulcaster as Magistrate
Constance Reason as Magistrate
Ernest Blyth as Magistrate
Michael Moore as Second Usher

Advertisement












Episodes

Hazell: Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost (ITV 31 May 1979, with Meg Davies)

Published

on

By

Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost

In Hazell and the Suffolk Ghost our intrepid hero pays a visit to the seaside when an accountant, Peter Harlow, calls him in over a cottage he has been left in a will. He has no idea why he has been left the cottage but since he has taken over ownership more than a few strange things have been happening.

Hazell stays at the cottage for a few days and manages to find no small amount of comfort when Harlow’s wife Stephanie turns up (Harlow himself is in New York). Although there is clearly something spooky going on it’s definitely man made and it doesn’t take Hazell too long to work it out.

The episode was a rare outing outside of London for the series, it was filmed in the East Anglian village of Walberswick and surrounds. Although all the interiors were filmed in studio of coure.

classic quote
I may be common but I’m not stupid

production details
UK / ITV – Thames / 1×50 minute episode / Broadcast Thursday 31 May 1979

Writer: Richard Harris / Production Design: Philip Blowers, Peter Elliot / Director: Mike Vardy

Series: Hazell Season 2 Episode 7

cast
Nicholas Ball as Hazell
Michael Gaunt as Peter Harlow
John Woodnutt as Vicar
Desmond Llewellyn as Bell
Richard Simpson as Weaver
Meg Davies as Stephanie Harlow
Desmond McNamara as Tel
Peter Woodward as Gregory Summers
Joy Steward as Mrs Summers

Continue Reading

Episodes

Blake’s 7: Breakdown (BBC-1 6 Mar 1978, with Julian Glover)

Published

on

By

Continue Reading

Episodes

Blake’s 7: Project Avalon (BBC-1 27 Feb 1978, with Glynis Barber)

Published

on

By

Continue Reading

More to View