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Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, The (Handmade 1987, Maggie Smith, Bob Hoskins)

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With The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne producer Peter Nelson adapted Brian Moore’s 1955 award-winning first novel for the screen, shifting the locale of the original from Belfast to Dublin. Maggie Smith is simply superb as the eponymous Judith Hearne, an ageing Irish spinster orphan brought up by her selfish aunt (Wendy Hiller) who, after she suffers a stroke, makes her niece repay the debt by thanklessly nursing her.

After her aunt dies, Hearne moves from one boarding house to another, earning a precarious living as a piano teacher, being forced to move each time through the discovery of her secret drinking. She moves into the boarding house run on strict lines by Mrs Rice (Marie Kean). Hearne’s fellow guests include Rice’s middle-aged brother James Madden (Bob Hoskins) who has recently returned form New York. She naively mistakes his worldliness for sophistication while he, in turn wrongly interprets her gentility as a being an indication that she has money…

Clayton, one of Britain’s best and sadly far-too-rarely-used directors, handles the screenplay with sensitive assurance. He concentrates to impressive effect on his two leading players who reward him with memorable performances. Amazingly for a film with so complex an emotional development and emphasis on character, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne was shot in only seven weeks. The finished film, however, shows no signs of stress, speed or skimping but comes off marvellously, both as a fine version of Moore’s novel and as a major work of cinema in its own right.

UK / Handmade / 116 minutes / 1987

Writer: Peter Nelson, from the novel by Brian Moore / Cinematography: Peter Hannan / Music: Georges Delerue / Production Design: Michael Pickwood / Producers: George Harrison, Denis O’Brien / Director: Jack Clayton

Cast: Maggie Smith, Bob Hoskins, Wendy Hiller, Marie Kean, Ian McNeice, Alan Devlin

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California Split (Columbia 1974, Elliott Gould, George Segal)

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California Split

California Split is a movie about the adventures of two card players, and it stars two of 70s-era Hollywood’s most prolific male actors. Elliot Gould (M*A*S*H, 1970) plays Charlie Waters, a small-time card player who has the charisma and moxie of someone who’s way better at the tables than he actually is. Alongside him is George Segal (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, 1966) who plays Bill Denny, a magazine writer who moonlights as a casual player. Charlie and Bill meet in a California poker parlour game that turns heated over a dealt card hitting the floor, raising concerns of cheating. Despite this, the game continues, and one of them wins. This leads to the two players getting mugged by one of the game’s sore losers, giving them an experience that’s worth bonding over. The two become fast friends and this starts them off on a poker adventure that will test and reveal their true spirit.

In a 1974 review, Roger Ebert called California Split a “magnificently funny, cynical film”, which is probably the best way to describe the succeeding events following Bill and Charlie’s meet up. Regarded by many to be one of the best poker movies ever made, California Split is a quirky but ultimately realistic and darkly comedic look into the life and mind of card players. Despite this, you don’t really need to know a thing about poker beforehand in order to enjoy the movie. It’s a classic American adventure movie that has inspired countless other road trip movies and casino films.

From start to finish, California Split follows Bill and Charlie through the race tracks, seedy bars, private poker parties, Vegas’ second-rate casinos, treating bruises with hot shaving cream, waking up to massive hangovers, and even another mugging in which their instincts are put to the test. The result is less of a movie with careful exposition, and more of what feels like an inside look into the hilariously nightmarish world of America’s casino scene. The Telegraph calls the film one of Robert Altman’s best out of his extensive catalogue. It is brilliantly pieced together by his signature subtle visual prose, realistically overlapping dialogue, and the bravely understated introductions of his many quirky characters, California Split is one of the 70s’ definite must-see adventures. Such was the film’s realism that PartyPoker state that legendary player Thomas Austin Preston Jr. aka ‘Amarilo Slim’ had a small part. In his time Slim was known as one of the greatest ever poker players, winning 4 WSOP bracelets, and would have been an inspiration for the two main characters.

California Split is definitely a treat not just for card players, but for anyone who likes well-crafted movies about friendship and the makings of the American Dream.

main stars
George Segal, Elliot Gould Ann Prentis, Gwen Welsh, Edward Walsh, Joseph Walsh, Bert Remsen

crew details
Director: Robert Altman
Producer: Joseph Walsh, Robert Altman
Director of Photography: Paul Lohmann
Editor: O. Nicholas Brown, Lou Lombardo
Composer: Phyllis Shotwell
Screenwriters: Joseph Walsh
Production Designer: Leon Ericksen

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House Of Secrets (1956, Michael Craig, Julia Arnall)

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House of Secrets

When Michael Craig got his big break in the movies, he was the last actor to be contracted to the Rank Organisation and was receiving £30 a week for his efforts. His break arrived – almost a decade after his brother, John Gregson, appeared in Saraband for Dead Lovers – in House of Secrets (aka Triple Deception), a forerunner to the James Bond movies that would later become British cinema’s most successful franchise.

Based on Sterling Noel’s novel Storm over Paris, Craig stars as Larry Ellis, a naval officer who bears such a resemblance to a counterfeiter that he’s mistakenly arrested by the French police. When the real counterfeiter, Chancellor, is killed in a car crash, Larry is asked to impersonate the dead man with the aim of capturing the rest of his gang and the head of the illegal operation. Luckily, there is some help in the form of a British police inspector, Burleigh (Geoffrey Keen). With a tense denouement set on board a plane in mid-flight and boasting a fine use of its extensive Parisian locations, House of Secrets is a gripping, ripping spy yarn.

Michael Craig (arguably best known for his performance in Yield to the Night, also 1956) makes the most of his opportunity to shine, while Gerard Oury also stands out as Pindar, one of the duplicitous gang leaders. Director Guy Green went on to collaborate with Craig four years later on The Angry Silence.

UK / 1956

Director: Guy Green
Writers: Robert Buckner, Bryan Forbes (based on the novel by Sterling Noel)

Cast: Michael Craig, Julia Arnall, Brenda De Banzie, Barbara Bates, David Kossoff

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When Eight Bells Toll (1971, Anthony Hopkins, Corin Redgrave)

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When Eight Bells Toll

In When Eight Bells Toll Philip Calvert (Anthony Hopkins) is a rough-and-ready naval secret service agent called in by controller Uncle Arthur (Robert Morley) to solve the piracy of a fortune in gold bullion. With sidekick Hunslett (Corin Redgrave), he follows the trail to Scotland and the yacht of Greek millionaire Sir Anthony Skouras (Jack Hawkins), who’s accompanied by his wife Charlotte (Nathalie Delon). As the action mounts, the double-crosses increase and the bodies pile up, is Calvert on the right track or is Skouras innocent?

Made in the decade when Bond was the height of cinematic popularity, Perier’s film is tougher (he hints at more than a professional relationship between Calvert and Hunslett) but just as thrilling, with stunts and explosions galore. Hawkins, whose voice had to be dubbed due to the throat cancer that would kill him two years later, and Morley provide excellent support, the latter offering light relief while Nathalie Delon, making a rare appearance in an English-speaking role, supplies the suitably enigmatic and glamorous love interest.

UK / 1971

Director: Etienne Perier
Writer: Alistair MacLean

Cast: Anthony Hopkins, Corin Redgrave, Robert Morley, Jack Hawkins, Nathalie Delon

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